Deveron Trout

As fly fishers we all have our favourite beat or stretch of water that we love for different reasons, its location, the size, quality and numbers of brown trout, the pools and the water or maybe just because that stretch of water has been particularly kind to us in the past. For me the River Isla is one of my favs and a couple of spots in particular on this tributary of the Deveron.  Few rivers offer a more isolated feel without actual isolation, the Isla has been particularly generous to me with quality trout and memorable days and it is only 10 minutes from the front door. However this season my affections are being competed for and I have strayed, not far but love has grown for a beat on the middle Deveron. And has been getting far more attention from me these early days of the trout season.

Those of you that follow Tuff flyfishing on social media;

https://m.facebook.com/TUFFflyfishing.co.uk

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may have noticed me adoringly tweeting and flooding the Facebook world with loving words as of late and may well already have guessed where is this new love of mine well………..its Bridge of Marnoch! Should I be whispering? Possibly! Trout bums familiar with the Deveron will know this beat well and I confess it’s a beat I had only fished a couple of times before this season and without great success.  But it’s 2017 and something clicked. 


Opening 2 two weeks before my home beats on the 15th of March, rather than the 1st of April meant it got its chance to seduce me and it really did work its magic.  Stretching for just over 2 miles on the middle Deveron this beat has a great choice of waters – streamy sections, pocket waters and deep glides with nice seams galore. 

More than enough to keep any fly fishing fanatic happy,  Nymphers and “normal” fly fishers alike. Winding downstream from the top of the beat which lies just above the Marnoch bridge that carries the Banff road over the Deveron heading northward, the beat meanders downstream with a fantastic mix of water; comprising ————named pools, these  two miles of river hold a surprisigly large number of 2lb+ trout.

 https://www.tuffflyfishing.co.uk

With the nature of the beat it is possible to find some shelter when the wind howls, as it often does and on those blue sky days there is shade to find. 

Blue skies above and a strengthening westerly wind I headed downstream seeking a little shelter, surveying the water for those first signs of the hatch but no hint.  I prefer to fish dries almost all the time which means life can be some what more challenging but there is some thing so visual, engaging and enthralling watching the fly on the surface, the anticipation, the hope waiting for the take, so I often spend a fair bit of time watching for that rise brought on by the hatch.

So far this year there has been good hatches of LDOs and short lived hatches of March browns  have been coming off the water during the magic window lunch time window, to the point you could actually set your watch by them between 11am and 2.30pm. I have my favourite spots and others theirs and I am sure this is the point where you expect me to spill the details on my spot… Afraid not folks! Where would the fun be in that, you just have to fish the beat and find your spot and the beautiful trout they hold.
I stroll almost to the bottom of the beat without much in the way of hatch or fish rising.  I turn and stroll back upstream and with that mother nature flickes a switch and Upwings begin struggling through the surface film and floating on the rivers surface like a flotilla of sailing boat before drying their wings and climbing skyward or becoming a trout snack.

Slowly the trout begin to sip and pop on the surface taking emergers as they break through the suface of the river and as the hatch continues, what seems like reckless abandument sets in amongst the trout.  They feed hard with splashy breaches of the surface taking both emergers and the duns on the surface, so I cast to my first fish.  It’s a reachy cast to the far side of a seam that runs down the middle of the river, this fish keeps rising and appears to be a reasonable size and I need good accuracy for this as the fishs’ positions will mean that as soon as the line hits water will quickly generate drag on the fly.

The wind drops and I pull off a good cast and almost instantly drag takes effect but in that same moment the trout takes and runs; “fish on”.  Fishing a 4wt rod it feels like a good fish but sometimes it can be deceptive, especially as it fights upstream so  I am fighting the current as much as the fish.  And trying not to put too much strain on the fine 7X leader 2.4lb breaking strain. The trout quickly tires and I 

bring it to the net, a 2lb, 21in slab of gold.
For Fishing on the middle Deveron

Contact Frank at Henderson country sports  

TEL; 01888 562428

http://www.fishingthedeveron.co.uk/

I dry off the Cdc quill emerger quickly, almost frantic to get the fly back on the water, quick dusting of frogs fanny I mud the line and look for my next target. The sounds of rising fish draws me downstream; in and on the near side of a seam in the mouth of the pool below there are several fish rising to Upwings drifting by.  One fish in particular draws my lustful gaze, intermittently rising right in the seam, I throw out a cast from a crouched position in the water right on the rivers edge and clearly having used up my quota of good casts for the day I over shoot an I have to let the fly drift downstream so as not to spook my target. As I go to lift off, the water erupts in a splashy take and I am convinced I am in to a monster.  Hand trembling and my heart racing as line streams from my reel I play the fish back and forth eventually bringing it to the net only to discover, somewhat bemused by the fight it had put up, a 12in, ¾ of a pound fiinock (young seatrout) – what a fight! I devoutly go through the tasks of preparing my fly and leader again and cover my target, in fact I cover it dozens of times changing fly three time as frustration sets in.  The whiley trout either rises infront of, next to or behind and never touches the fly…… I consider my options, pour over the flybox and select an old favourite; a Para Adams sz14 barbless.  A quick change and I cast holding my breath as it lands a foot from the fish and is carried down and over the fish and past it.  I can feel a tiraid of expletives building when splash – he’s taken it! “fish on.” He must have turned and taken the fly on his nose as it came downstream.  As he goes diving for the river and shelter in the broken bedrock I fight, trying to bring him to the surface concious of my light leader but luck is on my side for once and I get the 22in, 2.5lb beauty to the bank and the net quick selfie and he is back in to the depths of the river, until next time.

Sitting in the water with a contented smile on my face, I reflect that there certainly is an above average number of these lunkers on the Rivers Deveron and Don but for me its all about catching beautiful wild Scottish brownies, regardless of wheather they are 9in quarter pounders or 29in 7lb slabs.  For myself its about the privilege of being on beautiful stretches of water in stunning locations just catching trout. Maybe I am more of an explorer that a trophy hunter. So remember folks, it’s not about the size……..apparently, its all about the 1ertwqytyoiewrtqerfishing experience.

2017 Trout Opening

Finally the wait is over! The Brown Trout season is open I could say its has been a long hard winter but it really hasn’t, dry and mild would be the best description. The rivers really haven’t seen much rain over the closed season certainly in Aberdeenshire and as the river opened on Wednesday the 15th many were at or only inches above summer levels, not great for the Salmon fisher but a bonus for the Brown Trout junkies dusting off the cobb webs after a long winters slumber. I would be lying if I said I hadn’t been out since the close of last season I had sated my thirst for fly fishing with a couple of trips to some to my favorite salmon beats on the Tay and Ness; a couple of shoulder knackering days chucking fluff for pike and even managed a day with the ladies (grayling) on the Tummel, but like a child on Christmas Eve ; trout season couldn’t arrive fast enough. I am ticket holder on the Deveron but my section of the river doesn’t open till the first of April so it was a quick phone call to 

Turriff tackle( http://www.fishingthedeveron.co.uk/

booking myself on a middle Deveron Beat for the 15th; Avochie (http://www.avochie.com) a great beat only a couple of miles down stream of Huntly. A fly only water popular with a hardcore of Aberdeenshires troutbums.


Famous for the heaviest UK fly caught salmon at 61lb in 1924 by Tiny Morrison, Avochie has 24 named pools including the Junction pool where the Isla, a river close to my own heart, meets the Deveron. The beat stretches for almost 2.5miles of which most is double bank fishing. Avochie is a classic salmon and sea trout beat; huts, well kept banks and defined pools, this fact seems to do little to discourage the brown trout which like the mix of deep pools and riffles and plenty of cover thanks to its boulder bed plus plentiful invertebrates that helps produce its hard fighting, slabs of gold, with some of considerable size. Opening week’s weather was even playing ball with mostly warm settled spring days and I had even heard tell of good Upwing hatches being seen already, most likely march browns and LDOs. Opening day was shaping up nicely.

The 15th opened to blue skies fringed with broken cloud and hardly a breath of wind, by 10am I was surveying the Junction pool, ready for the first cast of the 2017 season. No sooner had I laid the line on the water than a cold westerly wind began to blow bring a real chill to proceeding with it a building of cloud,


 I had set up two rods a 9”6’ 5wt for nymphs and wets, and a 9” 3wt for Dries ever hopeful of surface action. But within an hour I was a rod down. I still having difficulty understanding how it happened; as I climbed down a bank my size thirteen feet, myself and the 5wt found ourselves entangled lying at the rivers edge and my 4piece rod was now a 6piece rod, resulting in an eloquent tirade of expletive.  I was reduced to one rod, a 3wt and to add insult the westerly wind decided to strengthen. Only one option for it, find those shelter corners and lies, where the wind would allow a cast and its chill wasn’t killing any sign of the much hoped for hatch. Between 10am and the back of 2pm not a fish moved and not a touch had been had on nymph or spider, despair and frustration at my ineptitude was setting in. I slumped on the banks for a late lunch by a sheltered stretch of water on the Green Bank pool, the familiar early season rustiness and frustrations building.

My sulk and thoughts of home were broken by that magical sound of a supping fish! feeding on the surface, cat nip to a fisher. Scanning the water I pick out the joyous sight of upwings and the expanding rippling ring left by a feeding brownie, the odd March Brown hatching and drifting on the current appeared, drying itself on the surface film before clumsily climbing into the air or disappearing in a swirl as meal. 

Quick change of leader and fly and I have a single quill Cdc upwing as a point fly on an 7x (2.8lb) tippet waiting to tempt a feeding trout. Aiming for what I thought to be nice sized trout I cast about 10m upstream from where it was showing mid river letting the lazy current drift the fly over my target, an almost silent “sssup” a swirl and my size 14 fly disappears. 


Instinct took over, lifting into the fish the line tightens the rod tip doubles over…”FISH ON” it was smaller than I thought about a half pound it dives and runs, brilliant first fish of the season! But I should know better than assume, as quick as it was on it was off! I quickly retrieve with a couple of curses, take my time drying the fly off, re-mud the tippet and target another rising fish. Once again first cast, it takes it! “FISH ON” a better fish this time it takes off downstream the rod tip bouncing as the 3wt fights taking line I let it run and as I begin retrieving the line goes limp much like my my mood was going! I let rip a four-letter word barrage at myself. I slump back on the the bank and wait to see where the next fish rises but after half an hour; nothing has shown and not an upwing in sight I call it a day, I admit defeat and head for home!

I comfort myself with the knowledge that I have an entire season ahead of me, plenty of time! I assure myself it was nice to be out on the river blowing the Cobb webs off toasting the new season; 

Here’s to the season a head the heady summer evenings, the plentiful months of April and May as the trout feed hard, the early mornings of June and July, the caddis hatches of August and September. Here is to making the most of very moment on river and loch, here’s to the next adventure.

Chasing Spring Silver; on the Helmsdale and Thurso

Part 2 of 2 (Every Adventure has to start somewhere)

The journey north had been stunning in the gathering gloom and was a taste of the vistas and scenery that we were to experience over the next 2 days; it’s wild, remote sunning landscapes inspire, and in winter weather it is something to experience. Spending the night in Brora a wee town 10 miles south of the village of Helmsdale it was a quick jaunt North and on to this famous river. Having elected to fish the Association water which runs from the harbour 1.5mile upstream, in Spring this can be most likely to produce of all the beats on this 20mile river, famed for its once prolific Spring run like every river it has dropped off in recent years that is as much to do with the pressures on the species and the endless other factors threatening wild Atlantic Salmon than anything else, yet the Helmsdale still manages to consistently produce good numbers of fish.

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Tentative wading on the Helmsdale, sheets of sleet, rain and high wind, river high water and difficult wading, looking upstream east/north eastwards

Its location in stunning scenery, it’s history and influence on salmon fishing makes it all so worthy of a pilgrimage, just scanning a beat map or OS map of Strath Kildonan also known as Strath Ullie you can’t help but notice the origin of several famous flies alone that this river has contributed to the sport; the Kildonan Killer , yellow Torransh and of course the legendary Willie Gunn which some credit with having taken more fish than any other fly. There is also a sadder Scottish history associated with Helmsdale, the Strath and Sutherland as a whole but that is another story and I had ventured north to fish. The Helmsdale primary source is Loch Badanloch, 1 of 3 interconnected lochs Badanloch, Loch nan Clar and Rimsdale.  These lochs help to maintain water levels in drier times thanks to a Dam, so fishing is an option season long. Picking the day ticket up for  a very reasonable £25, generally it’s a first come first served basis but it always worth while to phone a head of time. The Helmsdale is unique in some respect as the waters above the Associations water are a collective of owners that work together in regards to the fishings, allowing their guests to to experience all the Helmsdale has to offer fishing different beat on different days. Similarly the opening week; 11th of January is free, all you have to do is register in advance and on each day of opening week you are alotted a beat for the day, personally I think this is a fantastic idea and allows anglers a taste of a river that might otherwise be out of reach. it also helps to get plenty of rods out in the hope of seeing the first salmon of the season, never a bad thing for a rivers’ reputation. Currently Association day tickets can be bought at the Helmsdale Tackle company shop in the centre of the village but sadly they are in the process of closing their retail shop to concentrate on online sales so where to get the tickets following the shops closure, I am unsure.

The Helmsdale tackle company does produce some of the finest flies on the market; beautifully hand tied, so with the permit I bought a few of their classic Willie Gunn copper tube that only 4 days earlier had scored Helmsdales first 2016 springer.

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Looking Downstream, East/south Eastwards across the Flat and Style pools

A mile by road up Strath Ullie brings you to the top of the Association beat, well sign posted next to a parking place a path leads down a flight of steps to the rivers left/north bank and the 2 most productive pools on the beat; the Flat and Style pools. The clear blue skies of earlier where now a distant pleasent memory, Mother Nature must have seen me tackling up and decided……well you can guess! Howling wind bringing with it sheets of heavy sleet and snow that looked like it was never going to stop, it was blowing 40mph from the Southeast/East straight in my face upstream. Hang it, I hadn’t travel 150miles not to fish! As I threw on my waders above the river Jen took pity on me and asked if I would like some company, someone to hold my net.  I was so grateful, as much as I love to flyfish there are times were I question my own sanity and just having someone there with you on the river bank when your fingers are blue numb and you are starting to believe your feet are lumps of ice can make the difference between fishing and sacking to off for the pub.

the Sharpes Gordon 2 13ft 9/10wt (http://www.sharpes.net/gordon-2 15ft 10WT salmon-rod-195-p.asp),

with an Orvis Large Arbor IV (http://www.orvis.co.uk/p/access-mid-arbor-fly-reels/3r44)

teamed with the Rio AFS Shooting head with hover1 sink tip (http://www.garryevans.co.uk)

I fished virtually this same set up on all 3 river how ever I did change the fly used, on the Ness the cone head monkey was the go to fly, but I was on new water on the Helmsdale and Thurso so opted for the tried and test Willie Gunn since only days earlier it had produced.


I tentatively waded into the style pool the very top pool on the Association water where the water was high with the snow, sleet melt and the colour of an over brewed cup of builders tea. I couldn’t see the bottom, just a peaty abyss it’s because these type of conditions, I always wear a life jacket and carry a wading staff. An unfamiliar river, its bottom and its nature is the quickest way to kill yourself, you go for a days fishing and end up fighting for your life, it may be cumbersome but it could save your life. It soon became apparent that wading just wasn’t going to be an option so I heaved myself from the water and got to laying my first cast and even with the 13ft rod it was easy to cover the whole water, but I have to say that I truly hate Spey casting from a bank and I recently discovered that when the cast was developed it was never supposed to be preformed with in 2 yards of the bank and I can understand why! at the back of my mind there is always a niggling worry that you catching the bank. I could have thrown in an upstream C cast but with the wind it was just easier to limit the time the line was in the air, casting at about 45 degrees across the river the line would land several feet upstream of me but I was determined to fish through the pools and at least give it ago.  The river was 18in plus up as I fished through the flat and style pools without a touch and in the two odd hours I had seen several cars with rods on them heading down the Glen and calling it a day.  A rather wet and cold Jen doing star jumps by the river sealed for me, we beat a retreat to a great wee café in the village to thaw out. The Helmsdale is such a truly iconic river it was great just to wet a fly on it, a cold and wet day on the river beats a day in the office. I made a promise to myself as we drew out of Helmsdale on to the A9 that I would be back. May is proving a productive month, so come warmer days in the months to come I will be back chasing silver on the Helmsdale.

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Snow storm coming in over the Beattrice oil platform, looking eastwards over the Moray Firth from Upper Latheron

Back on the A9 we had 50 miles left to Thurso and the final river on my northern adventure. It has been almost 10  years since I had ventured this far North on the East coast of Scotland, the West is a different story and is like a second home. I had forgotten how unique and stunning the landscapes of eastern Sutherland and Caithness are! As a recovering geologist the landscape is underlayen by some awesome mouth watering geology, a geology that paved many of the great cities of the world; London, Sydney and many more.  You can take the boy out of geology but not the geology out of the boy.

But I was here to fish and had left the rock hammer at home, I aimed to fish the lower section of the Thurso Beat 1 the Association water, but the first challenge was finding the shop to buy the permit. A small book shop little more than a broom cupboard the ticket was £40 for the day, which I felt was steep for a river that was not firing on cylinders of late and not a ghillie for help, from the outset I did not feel welcome. I was informed as a guest day ticket I could not fish below the graveyard in essence removing the lowest pools only.

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The Tail of the Salmon pool on the river Thurso

The river was beautiful nestled in channel below the rolling plateau like landscape that optimises the this stark beautiful part of Scotland. The river was running a couple of feet above normal, running fast and coloured much like the Helmsdale the previous day however the weather was more favourable, light wind and blue skies only occasionally broken by light snow showers as they drifted through. I chose to fish the well known Salmon pool above the weir, a long deep pool with lovely greasy water and boils which just looked as though it should hold fish, fishing from the West Bank wading was once again out of the question so I stuck to cast of 45-60ft aiming the copper tube Willie Gunn on the edge of the fast water that lay along the opposite bank and fished the fly round through the seam and the greasy water I fished slowly through the pool twice without a touch.

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Looking upStream south on the Thurso, Snow storm on the Horizon

I had enjoyed the 4.5 hours on this classic river but no success so with my frustration building, the sky darkening and heavier snow looming I opted to beat the retreat to the hotel and the Scotland vs Wales rugby, so from one passion to another. I alluded earlier to a less than welcoming reception to the day angler on this beat and I have to say it was only this beat that I fished so I cannot comment on the other higher beatsimage. Now I hate to be negative about the locations I fish or the sport in general but I was so disappointed to learn that I could have fished these tidal pools at the very mouth of the river, I was told otherwise and it sadly reflects how some Association waters are managed almost like private thiefdoms who would rather not see a visiting angler.  But I do have to say having spoken to the Chairman before we travelled he could not have been further from this, welcoming and very helpful but sadly this appears lacking in the other points of contact for the visiting angler who often pays more for a day than the members pay for a year. It is quickly forgotten that these visiting anglers are a valuable revenue stream for any Association water that allows the members to enjoy reasonably priced season tickets and river upkeep, is it so terrible a thing that a visiting angler catch the first fish or even just sample this beautiful river? because apart from the revenue, these fishers leave with a real appreciation of how lucky the locals are, a tinge of jealously that as a visitor it may only be that once a year that we get to sample the peaty waters.

 

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Looking down stream across the Salmon pool towards Thurso, beautiful conditions and a vast improvement on the previous day

The rugby concluded much like my previous two days fishings, without victory but I had loved every minute exploring a tiny bit of these fantastic classic Highland salmon Rivers. We headed South homewards on the homeward leg, a much needed rest and a chance on my local rivers, now that they were once again open for salmon; the Deveron, the Spey, the Dee and the Don.

Salmon Season, Tay Time

2016 entered with a real bang, weather providing the fireworks as we all know but thankfully after the storm’s, some settled proper winter weather arrived. The rivers began to drop as did the temperatures and by mid January the Scottish rivers started opening for the Salmon season, finally a tonic for my cabin fever and the chance to wet a fly, a quick visit to Fishpal (http:/fishpal.com) a couple of clicks and I was booked on the Meikleour and Islamouth beats; 2 miles of the mighty Tay, boat or bank fishing.

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Meikleour Bridge, Look upstream to ward the bridge from the Castle pool

At the start of every season I get that same child-like excitement, the same buzz and I can guarantee that the night before my first trip of every season will be a restless one. An alpine start, up at the back of 5am I was remarkable fresh and chomping at the bit! Quickly filling the car with the excess of gear that you always seem to need at this time of year, loaded as though I was away for an Artic adventure not a day on the Tay. I manage to squeeze in a quick bacon roll and I was out of the traps for the start of my 2016 season. I might be dramatic but any keen fisher will tell you that the start of the season is like rebirth; exciting prospects await, new adventures new sights beautiful locations and of course that adrenaline inducing, endorphin racing, rod bending moments as a fish takes your offered fly.

Heading South pale blue began to seep skywards across the eastern horizon and the day was dawning with almost perfect conditions, hardly a breath of wind and the temperature only just a couple of points below freezing, with these conditions were set to last the day, bliss! But what would I now blame my generally terrible Spey cast on if not the wind…..I am sure I would find an excuse.

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Misty Perthshire hills, looking North upstream from the Birch bank towards the Tunnel pool and Tunnel stream

The broad rolling farm laden glens of Cooper Angus were shrouded in a veil of mist, drifting between the towering trees and distant hill, at times obscuring the horizon and reducing the world to monochrome. nearing Meikleour the damage of the New Year storms became more evident, debris meters above the river suspended in leafless trees with high water marks in places beyond sight of any River, testament to the volume and power of the waters. but thankfully the river was now at a good height and I was eager to wet a fly and sample the Tay.

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Monochrome Misty world,looking upstream towards the Tunnel Stream and March pool hidden in the mists

Greeted by Dan Wright and Callum McRoberts the Head Ghillie with a warm wood burner and a cup of tea, at the inviting Ferry cottage boat house; its hard to tell that only 4 months earlier it had gone up in smoke now sporting its new roof and fire place. I can imagine is a struggle to leave the cozy fire side on days less inviting than this. but I was desperate to be out on the water, a quick chat and the application of several more layers a pair of waders and a life jacket, I was ready to have my first taste of the famous Tay and its world renowned fishing’s.

The Beat

Fishing Map Pool

Beat Map (Copyright Meikleour estate)

The Meikleour & Islamouth beat sits on the junction of the River Isla and the Tay and is famous for the Junction and Castle pools, 2 of the 14 named pools on the 2 mile beat, which sit 7 miles downstream of Dunkeld and 10 mile above Perth. Nestled in the rolling rich fertile farmland that lines the lower Tay, it is a consistent beat producing nearly 200 fish a year, Meikleour has been with the same family for over 300 years. The current owners have a real passion for fishing themselves, which is reflected in the effort, detail, expense and love that is clearly been put into maintaining and developing the beats facilities. The same passion for the beat is clear as soon as you talk to Callum and is reflected in enthusiasm with which past guests Tweet and speak about the beat. What I hadn’t been prepared for was the beauty of this stretch of the Tay even on a misty Scottish winters day.

The River Tay winds its 118 miles from source to coast through a stunning seasonally changing pallet of colour that takes in some of the most Shortbread box perfect scenery Scotland has to offer, from its mountain and moorland highland Perthshire sources. The Tay flows south through deep once glacial glens now cloaked in conifer and broadleaf, these glens and hills resonate with the past battles and history of Scotland. And Meikleour is a snap shot of Perthshires’ heritage and alluring scenic beauty, its towering tree lined banks draws you along the mighty peaty waters of the Tay.

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Callum McRoberts; Head Ghillie taking us upstream for the mornings fishing

Starting my exploration of this famous beat we motored upstream under the picturesque old red sandstone Meikleour Bridge, Callum on the outboard of the Tay boat a fantastically stable and wide boat with a good keel that cuts through the surging and boiling mass of the Tays’ peaty waters. These boats are reminiscent of the famous Leven style boats comfortable and a pleasure to fish from, this one in particular freshly painted and clearly well cared for. I’ve never river fished from a boat before, simply because most Scottish river are too small to require one, It provides a unique perspective letting you appreciate the shear width of the Tay and the mass of water flowing through it.

Behind us as we motor through the aptly named house pool, the striking red stone of the Meikleour bridge beamed against the monochrome mist filled world, framed on both sides by the towering broadleaf’s and conifers that line the banks of the peaty highway. The towering leafless trees parting to a grassy slope leading from river upwards to the beautiful Meikleour House partially hidden in the slowly drifting mists.

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Meikleour House; hidden in the mists with its view over the house pool, Image looking upstream towards the Pump house croy and Boxbush pool

Callum anchored the boat alittle further upstream in the Boxbush pool and I cast my first fly of 2016.

the Sharpes Gordon 2 15ft 10/11wt (http://www.sharpes.net/gordon-2—15-0-10-salmon-rod-195-p.asp),

with an Orvis Large Arbor IV (http://www.orvis.co.uk/p/access-mid-arbor-fly-reels/3r44)

teamed with the Rio AFS Shooting head with hover1 sink tip (http://www.garryevans.co.uk)

and the classic early season fly a 1.5in copper tube Monkey (http://www.grahamsonline.co.uk/product/the-long-monkey-copper-tube-salmon-fly-with-jungle-cock).

I felt like I could have used a rod twice the length and still fallen short.

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TheUnemployableflyfisher fishing through the castle pool, Opposite the Junction pool and the mouth of the river Isla

The Tay is a river I have never really fished well certainly not the lower Tay, I have fished the head waters of the Tay; River and Loch Tummel as well as the River Garry for trout and grayling but never Salmon. So this trip was a whole new world of experiences, for several reasons; the shear scale of the Tay, it is several orders of scale larger than what I usually fish wider and deeper it presents you with a huge body of water that truthfully intimidates as you contemplate trying to cover the water with a fly. unless you have a champion class cast, which I most certainly do not have, but what I lack in distance and length I make up for with trying…or so I’ve been told.

This casting requirement relates nicely to the other reason this trip was a new world, the fishing techniques! As its says at the top of the page and in the very name I am a fly fisher so with the Tay at 3ft above summer levels the most productive methods are spinning and harling. I can hear the collective gasp and in truth the thought of using any technique other than the fly generally elicits derision at best and at worst a high pitched girlish scream of shock  from myself, but as the collective “they” say “When in Rome”. So after a hour of ham fistedly casting the fly and angrily muttering insults at myself, I relent to the wisdom of Callum and pick up a spinning rod, to fish through the remainder of the pool. Approaching the tail Callum cautioned; a take if we are to get one is most likely here. But not a touch, the activity of earlier with fish showing had vanished and the water was quiet and a distinct chill was now in the air. We move on downstream to experience a new technique, that is all together alien to me.

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Harling; Rod in the rest as we search of fish, at the Pump house croy

Harling; a method I believe originated on the Tay certainly the name did. Most loch fishers will know it as Trolling, 3 lines with lures and spoons set at different lengths to the side and rear of the boat, and slowly the boat is motored back and forth across the the pool occasionally holding position in the current and over known lies, it is apparently one of the most productive methods at certain river heights and time of year and a complete eye opener to me. As we explored pool after pool slowly dropping downstream the air was developing a real chill and with it we saw little movement on the surface and not a touch. The boat taking the load of the casting the chat flowed from fishing to farming and much more as the morning slipped away unnoticed enjoying the chat with Callum and the refreshing pleasure of being out on the river after a long closed season. Reaching the Castle pool and still not a touch, Callum called lunch and we went in search of the wood burner warmth.

A quick lunch of my homemade newly christened “lucky steak” pies, which I hoped would bring a fish come the afternoon session, opting to fly fish I waded the castle pool slowly moving downstream through the pool. With every step I relaxed and my cast improved but still not a touch. Callum was determined to find me fish, so we took to the boat once more crossing the river to the famous Junction which sits opposite the Castle pool. A cracking, fishy looking deep greasy watered pool where the waters of the Isla and Tay meet, boil and churn together. In higher water this pool produces fish consistently and within moments fish began to top and show, my spirits soared and hopes of a fish raced. I returned to the Spinning, casting to the greasy boils where the water meet a couple of quick jigs to sink the lure and then a slow retrieve to the boat, and with every cast comes anticipation of a Take. I send a cast out behind the boat and sink the lure with a couple of jerks of the reel a brief pause and I begin a slow retrieve, I can feel the the lure flutter and bite into the sur

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Kelt from the Junction Pool

ging water of the junction pool. My anticipation waning, when the faintest knock, and before I can acknowledge it I feel that familiar adrenaline inducing take, the whole reason we fish! “Fish On!” Waves of excitement and relief course through me as I play the fish back to the boat, but its quite evident I’ve got a Kelt on the end of the line, alas no springer. But you couldn’t tell from the smile on my face, it just very enjoyable putting a bend in the rod and seeing a fish coming to the boat, regardless of it being a springer or not. Three casts later and I am shouting “fish on” as we approach the tail of the pool, another kelt more coloured than the first has take my lure, but it sheds the hook within feet of the boat and is gone with a splash into the peat darkness. Moments later Callum too is into a fish and as quickly as its on its off. Its the last fish or touch we see for the day but At least we have had a fish and put a couple of bends in our rod.

Returning to the Boat house and its warmth at the end of the day I was already planning my next Visit to this Beat, No springer but thats Salmon fishing it is a privilage just to see fish and to fish on a beautiful, well kept beat like Meikleour I really can’t praise it high enough; brilliant setting, quality facilities, with a real passion for the sport and its future. I can truthfully say i have not enjoyed my time more in a boat on a cold day; Callum is great Company and an invaluble source of Knowledge about the beat, the lies and fishing in general. if you intend to experience the mighty Tay I have to say try a day or more on the Meikleour and Islamouth Beat.